TESTED: Reedin Super-E

Alongside the Kev-Pro, Reedin have produced the Super-E as a more accessible board for mere mortals. A similar outline and channeling system have been implemented but with a different flex pattern for more of a focus on ease of use and comfort. Reedin are producing the Super-E in Poland, and the European production standards are immediately apparent. In the hands it feels well detailed, particularly in the finish and it is extremely light for its size. The base has a full concave divided out into three defined channels running right out to the tips. This is designed to get as much grip as possible under your back foot. There’s also an additional edging channel running along the inside of the rail.

The board’s tips are relatively thin, with more thickness in the center of the board. It’s a grippy 90-degree box rail throughout the entire length. Proudly recessed thumb grabs in the center for easy board-offs confirm that this is a board from Kevin Langeree, as it’s his Big Air trademark. Straps are separated micro adjustable front and back and are well integrated into the footpads. The horizontally ribbed EVA foot pads are reassuringly grippy, preventing your feet sliding backwards and out of the strap on harsh landings, and provide good feedback from the board without feeling too harsh. The screws are stored in a tiny pocket integrated in the strap, and the duck angle is adjustable on a circular-toothed system, much like a snowboard binding.

What’s most surprising about the Super-E is the extremely predictable pop you can generate without having to ride at crazy board speeds with loads of power. It’s extremely forgiving for the average rider, and whilst learning new tricks you are not going to have to go in so committed and get so beaten up if you stack it, and consequently it is going to make it far easier to expand your trick repertoire. Immediately it feels flexible and grippy with performance on tap, and we felt that it probably biases more towards strapped riding rather than boots.

The flex pattern maintains enough forgiveness to deal with harsher, choppy conditions and maintains grip without being too harsh on the knees. For traditional strap-based freestyling it’s an aspirational weapon and is guaranteed to provide the qualities you need to confidently take your riding up a notch. Kevin has been riding and developing twintips for many moons and he has ticked all of the boxes for the sector of the market that the Super-E is geared towards.

In a sentence: Reedin tout themselves as a brand who only design equipment they like to ride themselves, and Kevin and Damien’s personalities and riding styles are stamped all over the Super-E: it’s an entertaining ride for a crowd-pleasing playful freerider.

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